What is CGEP?

The Commonwealth Graduate Engineering Program (CGEP) is designed to provide individuals with strong undergraduate level engineering backgrounds an opportunity to pursue Master of Engineering degrees without leaving their jobs. This is done as a long‐standing partnership between the State Council on Higher Education in Virginia (SCHEV), and four other schools.

You can learn more about CGEP at its web site, cgep.virginia.gov.

The CGEP advantage

The advantage of the CGEP partnership is flexibility for our students!

Almost all CGEP courses are delivered in a real‐time, interactive format, right along side on‐grounds students. That said,
you always have the option of taking them asynchronously by watching the classroom recordings.

Further, you may take up to half of the credits toward your degree from one of the other four CGEP partner institutions; this is more than is allowed for on‐grounds students or for non‐CGEP institutions. This arrangement allows you to
complete your degree as flexibly and in as short a time as possible.

CGEP contacts

You can learn more about CGEP from the CGEP web site. You can also reach out directly to the Program Directors at each of the partner schools.

A brief history of CGEP

The UVA distance education program (CGEP) began in 1983 with a live single point-to-point broadcast from UVA to the Cabell Library at VCU – a “receive site.” Students who could not attend a class session would be sent a VHS tape via postal mail to review the missed material.  Homework and tests were handled by paper and postal mail as well. 

By the fall of 1986, however, fast changes were already taking place as our courses were now offered via satellite. One receive site turned into 22.  Students could participate at VCU, from other locations around Virginia, and in a few places out of the state.  In the 1990s, the satellite signal changed from analog to digital, and then we adopted new technologies, leaving satellite behind completely and moving to digital video-conferencing. 

In 2011, courses were delivered live using two-way web-conferencing technology, and by the spring of 2012, live, interactive web-conferencing had become our primary mode of course delivery.  Gone are the days of receive sites and VHS tape shipments. 

Today, students can take a class, submit homework, review course materials and lectures, and earn their degree, from wherever they have Internet access – within the state or on the other side of the globe.